Science Action Network

Join the Science Action network and spend 5 minutes per week de-bunking animal rights misinfomation.

Each week myths and mis-information about animal research are published in newspapers and online and this might help explain the 10% fall in support for animal research. So UAR has set up a social media campaign called the Science Action Network to help supporters of biomedical research to spend just five minutes per week debunking some of this pseudoscience.

These resources can help you make your argument:

Forty reasons why we need animals in research - tweet fitting one liners

http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/how/myths-and-facts - general myth busting

http://speakingofresearch.com/extremism-undone/bad-science/ - general myth busting

http://speakingofresearch.com/extremism-undone/alternatives/ - limits of replacement technology http://www.armyths.org/ - general myth busting

We, and the other members of the network, tweet links that contain misleading claims or just plain wrong information. We’ve established a new hashtag - #ARnonsense– for this and are happy to see it’s now being increasingly widely used.

Fellow tweeters can follow @ARnonsenseRT (you don’t need a Twitter account to do this) to see a full list of all #ARnonsensetweets. UAR also post regular #ARnonsense links as well as campaign updates to our Facebook group.

We’re making a difference

Where the Science Action Network has linked to articles we have found the number of responses in support of biomedical research tends to double. Where we have highlighted polls the results have moved from around 40% in favour to 80% in favour of animal research.

Speaking of Research wrote an article on why we must respond to this internet activism that is definitely worth reading – they have also been tweeting #ARnonsense from their account @SpeakofResearch.

So we invite you to join the Science Action Network and take 5 minutes each week to challenge mis-information about animal research so that we can have an even greater impact on public opinion.

Last edited: 19 November 2014 11:10