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1 January 1970

Posted by: Richard Tidmarsh

Category: News

Results

Child skin-cancer gene identified

A gene essential for the development of a rare form of childhood skin cancer has been identified.
A gene essential for the development of a rare form of childhood skin cancer has been identified. The gene, which when turned off prevents the formation of tumours in mice, could… https://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/child-skin-cancer-gene-identified/

Artificial skin graft success

Artificial human skin developed in the laboratory has been successfully grafted onto mice.
Artificial human skin developed in the laboratory has been successfully grafted onto mice. The finding offers hope for new treatment methods for skin diseases which wouldn't… https://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/artificial-skin-graft-success/

Skin cells to brain cells for better treatments

Skin cells have been transformed directly into functioning brain cells for the first time in a new study using mice.
Skin cells have been transformed directly into functioning brain cells for the first time in a new study using mice. Previously scientists believed that adult cells first… https://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/skin-cells-to-brain-cells-for-better-treatments/

Why a little bit of dirt never harmed anyone

‘Friendly' bacteria living on the skin can be beneficial to our health, according to new research using mice and human cells.
‘Friendly' bacteria living on the skin can be beneficial to our health, according to new research using mice and human cells. The skin's microflora - the bacteria that live on… https://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/why-a-little-bit-of-dirt-never-harmed-anyone/

Flaky tail mouse mimics eczema

Scientists have discovered a mouse which carries the genetic mutation responsible for increased susceptibility to eczema, and eczema-related asthma.
Scientists have discovered a mouse which carries the genetic mutation responsible for increased susceptibility to eczema, and eczema-related asthma. The mutation occurs in the gene… https://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/flaky-tail-mouse-mimics-eczema/

Last edited: 19 September 2014 04:49