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1 January 1970

Posted by: Richard Scrase

Category: News

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Scientists crack the vision code

Two scientists have cracked the code used by cells at the back of the eye to convert light into a signal that our brain is able to understand.
Two scientists have cracked the code used by cells at the back of the eye to convert light into a signal that our brain is able to understand. Using gene therapy and a… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/scientists-crack-the-vision-code/

Retina grown in the lab

Mouse retinas have been grown in the lab using embryonic stem cells.
Mouse retinas have been grown in the lab using embryonic stem cells. The technique could lead to treatments for human eye diseases. The retinas are the most complex tissue… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/retina-grown-in-the-lab/

Enzyme linked to blindness

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been linked to the lack of a protective enzyme in the retina.
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has been linked to the lack of a protective enzyme in the retina. The finding could lead to new treatments for the disease. AMD is one of… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/enzyme-linked-to-blindness/

Retinal cells transplanted into blind mice

Retinal cells, necessary for colour vision, have been successfully transplanted into blind mice.
Retinal cells, necessary for colour vision, have been successfully transplanted into blind mice. The mice were engineered to mimic a form of childhood blindness called Leber's… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/retinal-cells-transplanted-into-blind-mice/

Primitive cells help blind mice see

Primitive retinal cells, that were previously thought to have no role in image formation, can help blind mice see.
Primitive retinal cells, that were previously thought to have no role in image formation, can help blind mice see. These photosensitive cells, known as ipRGCs, respond to light… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/primitive-cells-help-blind-mice-see/

Last edited: 19 September 2014 04:49