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1 January 1970

Posted by: Richard Scrase

Category: News

Results

Tasmanian Devil genome sequenced

The Tasmanian Devil is at risk of extinction in the wild due to a transmissible cancer passed on when one animal bites another.
The Tasmanian Devil is at risk of extinction in the wild due to a transmissible cancer passed on when one animal bites another. The cancer causes a facial tumour that kills the… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/tasmanian-devil-genome-sequenced/

Magnetic medicines treat brain tumours

The barrier between blood vessels and the brain may no longer limit the delivery of medicines to tumours, research on rats shows.
The barrier between blood vessels and the brain may no longer limit the delivery of medicines to tumours, research on rats shows. The blood-brain barrier protects the brain… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/magnetic-medicines-treat-brain-tumours/

Puma may aid tumour growth

A study on mice suggests that cell suicide may encourage tumours to grow instead of destroying them.
A study on mice suggests that cell suicide may encourage tumours to grow instead of destroying them. Damaged DNA causes cell death – a process triggered by the protein PUMA.… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/puma-may-aid-tumour-growth/

Ferrets, flu, fish and pharmaceuticals

Grants worth £4 million have just been announced for 13 science projects that aim to minimise the use of laboratory animals and improve their welfare.
Grants worth £4 million have just been announced for 13 science projects that aim to minimise the use of laboratory animals and improve their welfare. The latest grants,… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/ferrets-flu-fish-and-pharmaceuticals/

Scientists watch armed immune cells fight cancer

Armed and tagged immune cells can be watched attacking tumours in mice in real time.
Armed and tagged immune cells can be watched attacking tumours in mice in real time. Lymphocyte cells were armed with T cell receptors which allowed them to detect and destroy… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/scientists-watch-armed-immune-cells-fight-cancer/

Physical, social stimulation may starve tumours

Mice with cancer living in enriched environments had smaller tumours, new research has revealed.
Mice with cancer living in enriched environments had smaller tumours, new research has revealed. Although normally housed in groups of five, scientists studied mice with cancer… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/physical-social-stimulation-may-starve-tumours/

Canine cancer consortium

Two organisations have joined together to further research into canine cancer.
Two organisations have joined together to further research into canine cancer. They hope their collaboration will also provide insights into connective tissue cancers in humans.… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/canine-cancer-consortium/

Extra chromosome protects against cancer

An extra copy of chromosome 21 may boost protection against cancer, research on mice suggests.
An extra copy of chromosome 21 may boost protection against cancer, research on mice suggests. A study of mice with extra copies of chromosome 21 showed rates of tumour formation… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/extra-chromosome-protects-against-cancer/

Scar tissue process revealed

Research on mice has revealed the process which limits the accumulation of excessive scar tissue.
Research on mice has revealed the process which limits the accumulation of excessive scar tissue. Excessive tissue produced during the healing of chronic injuries can be… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/scar-tissue-process-revealed/

Broccoli chemical kills cancer cells

A chemical in broccoli can kill breast cancer cells and halt tumour growth, accroding to new research on mice.
A chemical in broccoli can kill breast cancer cells and halt tumour growth, accroding to new research on mice. Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring chemical found in broccoli.… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/broccoli-chemical-kills-cancer-cells/

Walnuts to fight prostate cancer

Eating walnuts as part of a balanced diet may reduce the size and growth of prostate tumours, a study on mice has shown.
Eating walnuts as part of a balanced diet may reduce the size and growth of prostate tumours, a study on mice has shown. Both prostate cancer patients and those with heart… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/walnuts-to-fight-prostate-cancer/

Absent gene heals mice without scarring

Mice lacking the p21 gene can be healed scar free, a study has shown.
Mice lacking the p21 gene can be healed scar free, a study has shown. Scientists believe gene p21, known to protect against cancer, plays a key role in the regeneration of… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/absent-gene-heals-mice-without-scarring/

Loneliness linked to cancer in rats

Loneliness and stress are more likely to cause breast cancer, a study using rats suggests.
Loneliness and stress are more likely to cause breast cancer, a study using rats suggests. A team studied the difference between isolated rats and rats living in a social… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/loneliness-linked-to-cancer-in-rats/

Cancer vaccine implant success in mice

A cancer ‘vaccine' which can be implanted under the skin and instructs the body to attack tumour cells has proved successful in experiments with mice.
A cancer ‘vaccine' which can be implanted under the skin and instructs the body to attack tumour cells has proved successful in experiments with mice. Cancers often manage to… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/cancer-vaccine-implant-success-in-mice/

Biomatrix may allow tumour testing without mice

Mice are used widely in the study of cancer and to test the clinical efficiency and safety of anti-cancer therapies.
Mice are used widely in the study of cancer and to test the clinical efficiency and safety of anti-cancer therapies. Nearly 400,000 mice were used in cancer research in both… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/biomatrix-may-allow-tumour-testing-without-mice/

Lung tumour treatment shows promise

Researchers have discovered a new medicine which is able to stop lung tumours from growing in mice, even eliminating them altogether in half of all cases.
Researchers have discovered a new medicine which is able to stop lung tumours from growing in mice, even eliminating them altogether in half of all cases. The cancers being… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/lung-tumour-treatment-shows-promise/

Dogma would deny dogs new cancer drug

Antivivisectionists have spoken out against giving dogs with cancer a new cancer drug.
Antivivisectionists have spoken out against giving dogs with cancer a new cancer drug. Nedim Buukmichi, a vet speaking for the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection, told… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/dogma-would-deny-dogs-new-cancer-drug/

'Master gene' for immune cells identified

Researchers have identified the master gene that causes blood stem cells to turn into natural killer (NK) immune cells.
Researchers have identified the master gene that causes blood stem cells to turn into natural killer (NK) immune cells. NK cells are white blood cells, and are the immune… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/master-gene-for-immune-cells-identified/

Stem cell link to prostate cancer

A new study identifies a stem cell that may cause some types of prostate cancer, at least in mice.
A new study identifies a stem cell that may cause some types of prostate cancer, at least in mice. Called CARNs (castrion-resistant Nkx2.1-expressing cells), they are responsible… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/stem-cell-link-to-prostate-cancer/

Diesel fumes grow new blood vessels?

New findings indicate that the link between diesel exhaust fumes and cancer lies in the ability of particles within the exhaust fumes to cause the growth of new blood vessels, which can aid tumour development.
New findings indicate that the link between diesel exhaust fumes and cancer lies in the ability of particles within the exhaust fumes to cause the growth of new blood vessels,… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/diesel-fumes-grow-new-blood-vessels/

Last edited: 19 September 2014 04:49