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1 January 1970

Posted by: Richard Scrase

Category: News

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Nobel Prize 2018

Jointly awarded to James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation.
Cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was jointly awarded to James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo for their… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/communications-media/nobel-prize-2018/

This week in animal research 18/03/16

Reversing cancer in frogs
Healthy bones returned in mice with age-related osteoporosis after stem cell treatment Researchers at the University of Toronto have restored osteoporotic bone to healthy,… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/communications-media/this-week-in-animal-research-180316/

This year in animal research - 2015

A subjective review of the years animal research stories
This year in animal research – 2015 A review of this year as filtered by UAR and several themes emerged: there were reports of new vaccines against AIDS, Ebola and malaria; new… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/communications-media/this-year-in-animal-research-2015/

This week in animal research 09/10/15

Elephants rarely get cancer
07/10/15 Scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Nottingham have been funded to develop a gel that will match many of the biological structures of human breast… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/this-week-in-animal-research-091015/

Can you cure my cancer?

BBC Panormama programme features latest research including work with animals
Panorama reported on the cancer patients who are pioneering a new generation of drug treatments. Patients given just months to live are keeping the disease at bay for years; for… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/communications-media/can-you-cure-my-cancer/

This Week in Animal Research: 19th-25th June

Research in rats suggests that breast cancer patients should avoid even low levels of light in the bedroom.
Research in rats suggests that breast cancer patients should avoid even low levels of light in the bedroom. Light in the evening before bed lowers levels of melatonin, an… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/week-in-animal-research-19th-25th-june/

This Week in Animal Research 12th-18th July

A “biological pacemaker”, created by injecting a specific gene into heart cells, has effectively cured a disease in pigs that causes a very slow heart rate.
A “biological pacemaker”, created by injecting a specific gene into heart cells, has effectively cured a disease in pigs that causes a very slow heart rate. Researchers from the… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/this-week-in-animal-research-12th-18th-july/

Why are we still waiting for a cure?

The latest post in the UAR staff blog series is written by our Science Writer, Dr Ian Le Guillou, who takes a look back on the progress made in treating cancer and the different tools doctors have at their disposal.
The latest post in the UAR staff blog series is written by our Science Writer, Dr Ian Le Guillou, who takes a look back on the progress made in treating cancer and the different… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/staff-blog/why-are-we-still-waiting-for-a-cure/

Injecting natural signalling molecules help immune system shrink brain cancer tumour

Naturally-occurring signalling molecules injected directly into tumours can aid the body’s own immune response to destroy tumours in mice, researchers have found.
Naturally-occurring signalling molecules injected directly into tumours can aid the body’s own immune response to destroy tumours in mice, researchers have found. The injection… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/injecting-natural-signalling-molecules-help-immune-system-shrink-brain-cancer-tumour/

2013 Nobel Prize Predictions

The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2013 will be announced on 7th October
The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for 2013 will be announced on 7th October. Until then, UAR is placing its bets on who is going to win. It’s pretty hard to guess who’s… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/communications-media/2013-nobel-prize-predictions/

New treatment allows stronger radiotherapy

Radiotherapy is a powerful tool in treating cancer, but it is a blunt instrument.
Radiotherapy is a powerful tool in treating cancer, but it is a blunt instrument. In some cases the radiation can be as lethal as the cancer and so treatment regimes must always… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/new-treatment-allows-stronger-radiotherapy/

Mice experiments help scientists improve cancer vaccines

An additive used in anti-cancer vaccines is stopping them working properly, research in mice suggests.
An additive used in anti-cancer vaccines is stopping them working properly, research in mice suggests. The latest findings contradict the previously-held belief that an oil in the… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/mice-experiments-help-scientists-improve-cancer-vaccines/

Lung cancer protein could be a target for new therapy

Scientists have discovered a protein on the surface of cancerous lung cells that could be the target for a new therapy.
Scientists have discovered a protein on the surface of cancerous lung cells that could be the target for a new therapy. Tests in mice showed that specific targeting of the protein… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/lung-cancer-protein-could-be-a-target-for-new-therapy/

Alcohol breakdown product damages stem cells

New research in mice has shown that stem cells in bone marrow are extremely sensitive to the main breakdown product of alcohol which causes irreversible damage to their DNA.
New research in mice has shown that stem cells in bone marrow are extremely sensitive to the main breakdown product of alcohol which causes irreversible damage to their DNA. The… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/alcohol-breakdown-product-damages-stem-cells/

Mice show crucial role of cancer stem-cells

Do cancers have their own stem-cells?
Do cancers have their own stem-cells? The cancer research community have long debated their existence, but solid evidence has been lacking to support not only the existence of… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/mice-show-crucial-role-of-cancer-stem-cells/

Cancer risk increased by bacterial infection

Long-lasting inflammation, such as that caused by persistent bacterial infections, is estimated to account for up to 16% of cancers worldwide.
Long-lasting inflammation, such as that caused by persistent bacterial infections, is estimated to account for up to 16% of cancers worldwide. By studying stomach infection in… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/cancer-risk-increased-by-bacterial-infection/

Rare eye cancer pathway uncovered

Scientists have uncovered the secret behind the rapid progression of retinoblastoma, a rare type of childhood eye cancer.
Scientists have uncovered the secret behind the rapid progression of retinoblastoma, a rare type of childhood eye cancer. Rather than being caused by a series of mutations, like… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/rare-eye-cancer-pathway-uncovered/

Cancer treatment targets tumour growth protein

A chemical tested in mice, cell cultures and human biopsies has proved highly effective in preventing the growth of tumours.
A chemical tested in mice, cell cultures and human biopsies has proved highly effective in preventing the growth of tumours. By identifying a new role for a well-known protein in… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/cancer-treatment-targets-tumour-growth-protein/

Gene confers resistance to Marek’s disease

Scientists have identified a gene that appears to make chickens immune to the deadly Marek's virus - responsible for millions of deaths in chickens each year.
Scientists have identified a gene that appears to make chickens immune to the deadly Marek's virus - responsible for millions of deaths in chickens each year. The discovery could… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/gene-confers-resistance-to-mareks-disease/

Naked mole rat DNA exposes its age-defying secrets

A team of scientists have begun to unravel the secrets underlying the long life enjoyed by naked mole rats.
A team of scientists have begun to unravel the secrets underlying the long life enjoyed by naked mole rats. They have identified genes that they believe are responsible for the… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/naked-mole-rat-dna-exposes-its-age-defying-secrets/

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Last edited: 19 September 2014 04:49