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1 January 1970

Posted by: Richard Scrase

Category: News

Results

Achilles’ heel identified for rare cancer

Research using genetically modified mice has given scientists a unique insight into the molecular cause of an incurable human cancer.
Research using genetically modified mice has given scientists a unique insight into the molecular cause of an incurable human cancer. The researchers bred a mouse that… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/achilles-heel-identified-for-rare-cancer/

Glowing mice

A technique which enables the earliest stages of cancer to be observed in living mice has been developed.
A technique which enables the earliest stages of cancer to be observed in living mice has been developed. The skin of the genetically-engineered mice literally lights up as the… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/glowing-mice/

Mice show crucial role of cancer stem-cells

Do cancers have their own stem-cells?
Do cancers have their own stem-cells? The cancer research community have long debated their existence, but solid evidence has been lacking to support not only the existence of… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/mice-show-crucial-role-of-cancer-stem-cells/

Anti-viral medicine slows brain tumour growth

Scientists have found that the growth of Medulloblastoma brain tumour cells in mice can be significantly slowed using existing anti-viral medicines.
Scientists have found that the growth of Medulloblastoma brain tumour cells in mice can be significantly slowed using existing anti-viral medicines. By studying human tumours and… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/anti-viral-medicine-slows-brain-tumour-growth/

Colchicine from Crocus kills cancer

A modified version of a chemical found in the Autumn crocus has shown exceptional promise as a tumour-killing agent in mice and will soon begin clinical trials in humans.
A modified version of a chemical found in the Autumn crocus has shown exceptional promise as a tumour-killing agent in mice and will soon begin clinical trials in humans. The… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/colchicine-from-crocus-kills-cancer/

Brain tumour growth slowed

Brain cancers caused by malignant gliomas account for around 3,000 deaths in the UK each year.
Brain cancers caused by malignant gliomas account for around 3,000 deaths in the UK each year. Unfortunately, the outlook for patients with malignant gliomas is poor. For patients… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/brain-tumour-growth-slowed/

Prostate tumours reduced in mice

Prostate tumours have been in reduced in mice using a medicine originally designed to treat obesity.
Prostate tumours have been in reduced in mice using a medicine originally designed to treat obesity. Scientists used the medicine, called STO 609, to stop the production of an… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/prostate-tumours-reduced-in-mice/

Gene linked to lung cancer spread

Scientists have identified a genetic change that makes lung tumours more likely to spread to other parts of the body.
Scientists have identified a genetic change that makes lung tumours more likely to spread to other parts of the body. The genetic change discovered in mice has also been found in… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/gene-linked-to-lung-cancer-spread/

Enzyme reduces cancer spread

The spread of cancer to other organs has been reduced in mice by blocking an enzyme.
The spread of cancer to other organs has been reduced in mice by blocking an enzyme. Researchers blocked the enzyme LOXL2 in mice using chemicals and genetic engineering… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/enzyme-reduces-cancer-spread/

Magnetic medicines treat brain tumours

The barrier between blood vessels and the brain may no longer limit the delivery of medicines to tumours, research on rats shows.
The barrier between blood vessels and the brain may no longer limit the delivery of medicines to tumours, research on rats shows. The blood-brain barrier protects the brain… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/magnetic-medicines-treat-brain-tumours/

Puma may aid tumour growth

A study on mice suggests that cell suicide may encourage tumours to grow instead of destroying them.
A study on mice suggests that cell suicide may encourage tumours to grow instead of destroying them. Damaged DNA causes cell death – a process triggered by the protein PUMA.… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/puma-may-aid-tumour-growth/

Enzymes are target for lung cancer treatment

‘Switching off' certain enzymes helps reduce tumours in mice, research has shown.
‘Switching off' certain enzymes helps reduce tumours in mice, research has shown. Tumour growth is stimulated by the proteins Ras and Rho. For these proteins to function they… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/enzymes-are-target-for-lung-cancer-treatment/

Absent gene heals mice without scarring

Mice lacking the p21 gene can be healed scar free, a study has shown.
Mice lacking the p21 gene can be healed scar free, a study has shown. Scientists believe gene p21, known to protect against cancer, plays a key role in the regeneration of… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/absent-gene-heals-mice-without-scarring/

Biomatrix may allow tumour testing without mice

Mice are used widely in the study of cancer and to test the clinical efficiency and safety of anti-cancer therapies.
Mice are used widely in the study of cancer and to test the clinical efficiency and safety of anti-cancer therapies. Nearly 400,000 mice were used in cancer research in both… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/biomatrix-may-allow-tumour-testing-without-mice/

'Master gene' for immune cells identified

Researchers have identified the master gene that causes blood stem cells to turn into natural killer (NK) immune cells.
Researchers have identified the master gene that causes blood stem cells to turn into natural killer (NK) immune cells. NK cells are white blood cells, and are the immune… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/master-gene-for-immune-cells-identified/

Diesel fumes grow new blood vessels?

New findings indicate that the link between diesel exhaust fumes and cancer lies in the ability of particles within the exhaust fumes to cause the growth of new blood vessels, which can aid tumour development.
New findings indicate that the link between diesel exhaust fumes and cancer lies in the ability of particles within the exhaust fumes to cause the growth of new blood vessels,… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/diesel-fumes-grow-new-blood-vessels/

Nanobees deliver deadly sting

A group of scientists has harnessed the power of bee venom and used it to kill tumour cells in mice.
A group of scientists has harnessed the power of bee venom and used it to kill tumour cells in mice. By arming small particles dubbed nanobees with the bee venom melittin,… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/nanobees-deliver-deadly-sting/

Last edited: 19 September 2014 04:49