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1 January 1970

Posted by: Richard Scrase

Category: News

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Toxins in 3D printers

Zebrafish showed 3D printer polymers are toxic
Shirin Mesbah Oskui, a graduate student, is developing tools for studying zebrafish embryos, and she wanted to use a 3D printer in her research. However, her plans were thwarted… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/video-of-the-week/toxins-in-3d-printers/

Ten years of success from the 3Rs

In today’s blog, Understanding Animal Research’s Chief Executive, Wendy Jarrett, discusses a report by the NC3Rs celebrating 10 years of successful collaboration with the pharmaceutical industry to find ways to replace, refine and reduce the use of animal…
In today’s blog, Understanding Animal Research’s Chief Executive, Wendy Jarrett, discusses a report by the NC3Rs celebrating 10 years of successful collaboration with the… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/staff-blog/ten-years-of-success-from-the-3rs/

Shellfish toxin testing

The recently published Annual report (2009) of the Animals Scientific Procedures Inspectorate and Division highlights progress towards suitable alternatives to replace the use of mice in the testing for toxins in shellfish.
The recently published Annual report (2009) of the Animals Scientific Procedures Inspectorate and Division highlights progress towards suitable alternatives to replace the use of… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/shellfish-toxin-testing/

EU tries to avoid using 54 million more animals

A recent study suggests that the chemical industry will have to spend €9.5 billion (US$13.6 billion) on safety testing over the next decade.
A recent study suggests that the chemical industry will have to spend €9.5 billion (US$13.6 billion) on safety testing over the next decade. This is to comply with European Union… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/eu-tries-to-avoid-using-54-million-more-animals/

40,000 trout undercut costs, increase accuracy

The largest animal study ever on the cancer-causing risk (carcinogenicity) of chemicals could have profound implications for the species used in such testing, the numbers of animals used, and the accuracy of current tests.
The largest animal study ever on the cancer-causing risk (carcinogenicity) of chemicals could have profound implications for the species used in such testing, the numbers of… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/40000-trout-undercut-costs-increase-accuracy/

Last edited: 19 September 2014 04:49