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1 January 1970

Posted by: Richard Scrase

Category: News

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Jumping species: how good intentions spread diseases

f asked to think of the main challenges facing conservation, most people would suggest habitat loss, climate change and hunting.
If asked to think of the main challenges facing conservation, most people would suggest habitat loss, climate change and hunting. It is unlikely anyone would say pregnancy tests,… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/jumping-species-how-good-intentions-spread-diseases/

UAR at The Big Bang Fair 2013

The UAR Education Team had a fantastic time at The Big Bang Fair at ExCel in London which ran from the 14th -17th March this year.
The UAR Education Team had a fantastic time at The Big Bang Fair at ExCel in London which ran from the 14th -17th March this year. With The British Pharmacological Society (BPS)… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/schools-education/uar-at-the-big-bang-fair-2013/

Nearly £1 million towards replacing cancer tests

Scientists have been awarded nearly £1 million to develop new test methods that should substantially reduce the numbers of animals used for testing chemicals which may cause cancer.
Scientists have been awarded nearly £1 million to develop new test methods that should substantially reduce the numbers of animals used for testing chemicals which may cause… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/animal-welfare-alternatives/nearly-1-million-towards-replacing-cancer-tests/

Cancer treatment targets tumour growth protein

A chemical tested in mice, cell cultures and human biopsies has proved highly effective in preventing the growth of tumours.
A chemical tested in mice, cell cultures and human biopsies has proved highly effective in preventing the growth of tumours. By identifying a new role for a well-known protein in… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/cancer-treatment-targets-tumour-growth-protein/

Weight loss treatment works in obese monkeys

Researchers have shown that a new compound can significantly reduce the weight of monkeys by destroying blood vessels that feed fatty tissue.
Researchers have shown that a new compound can significantly reduce the weight of monkeys by destroying blood vessels that feed fatty tissue. The findings pave the way for the… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/weight-loss-treatment-works-in-obese-monkeys/

Enzyme linked to miscarriages and infertility

Studies of patient tissue and experiments using mice have linked a specific enzyme to both infertility and miscarriage.
Studies of patient tissue and experiments using mice have linked a specific enzyme to both infertility and miscarriage. Levels of the enzyme appear to determine when a woman is… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/enzyme-linked-to-miscarriages-and-infertility/

Sickle-cell anaemia treated in mice

Researchers have shown that they can treat sickle-cell anaemia in mice by switching on a haemoglobin gene usually only active before birth.
Researchers have shown that they can treat sickle-cell anaemia in mice by switching on a haemoglobin gene usually only active before birth. This demonstrates that a technique… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/sickle-cell-anaemia-treated-in-mice/

Lords affirm support for animal research

Members of the House of Lords on Tuesday affirmed their support for 'proper and appropriate' use of animals in medical research.
Members of the House of Lords on Tuesday affirmed their support for 'proper and appropriate' use of animals in medical research. They also criticised campaigns, such as those by… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/policy-issues/lords-affirm-support-for-animal-research/

Anti-viral medicine slows brain tumour growth

Scientists have found that the growth of Medulloblastoma brain tumour cells in mice can be significantly slowed using existing anti-viral medicines.
Scientists have found that the growth of Medulloblastoma brain tumour cells in mice can be significantly slowed using existing anti-viral medicines. By studying human tumours and… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/anti-viral-medicine-slows-brain-tumour-growth/

Treating 'Alzheimer's disease' in mice

Scientists working with mice have identified a molecule that appears to cause the dementia suffered by Alzheimer's patients.
Scientists working with mice have identified a molecule that appears to cause the dementia suffered by Alzheimer's patients. The finding opens up the possibility of designing a… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/treating-alzheimers-disease-in-mice/

Modified bacterium protects against TB

Mice infected with a genetically modified relative of the tuberculosis bacterium became immune to tuberculosis, a new study has shown.
Mice infected with a genetically modified relative of the tuberculosis bacterium became immune to tuberculosis, a new study has shown. The finding represents a novel way of making… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/modified-bacterium-protects-against-tb/

Spine repair allows rats to breathe again

Injuries that damage the spinal cord at the top of the neck can damage the nerve connections between the respiratory centre in the brain and the diaphragm muscles that we need to breathe normally.
Injuries that damage the spinal cord at the top of the neck can damage the nerve connections between the respiratory centre in the brain and the diaphragm muscles that we need to… http://www.understandinganimalresearch.org.uk/news/research-medical-benefits/spine-repair-allows-rats-to-breathe-again/

Last edited: 19 September 2014 04:49